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Josh Garver
 
May 11, 2018 | Josh Garver

Macadamia Nut Crusted Halibut with Pineapple Salsa

Print Recipe Here

INGREDIENTS (2 servings):
 
For the Halibut:
2 – 7-10oz filets of fresh halibut
1 quart of coconut milk
½ cup of honey
½ of a nutmeg (grated with micro-plane)
 
For the Crust:
1 cup of Macadamia Nuts – chopped
1 cup of breadcrumbs
½ cup of shaved coconut
Salt
Pepper

 
For the Pineapple Salsa:
½ of a fresh pineapple - diced
½ of a red onion – chopped finely
1 Jalapeno – fresh – chopped finely
1 garlic clove – chopped finely
Pepper
 
DIRECTIONS
Begin by whisking together the coconut milk, honey, and nutmeg. Clean and dry your halibut filets and lay them in a dish flat to marinate. Pour the coconut milk over the fish and let marinate for at least an hour.
 
Turn your oven to 425 degrees and begin prepping other ingredients. The salsa can always be made ahead of time and this measurement will leave some left over, which is always delicious.
 
Put the macadamia nuts into a food processor and pulsate till the nuts are finely chopped. Combine the nuts, breadcrumbs and coconut shavings into a bowl and stir together.

Take out a baking sheet, line with foil and spray with a nonstick oil.
 
After an hour or longer of marinating the fish, take the halibut filets out and toss them in the nut/breadcrumb mix. Place them on the baking sheet, leaving plenty of space between filets for proper cooking.
 
Cook the halibut for 12 minutes, at which point, briefly take the fish out. Brush with melted butter and honey gently. Set your oven to Low Broil. Place the fish back in and keep an eye on it. Leave in just long enough to brown the tops of the fish. Once browned to your liking, remove from the oven, serve immediately. Plate the fish and top with the salsa. ENJOY!!
Time Posted: May 11, 2018 at 2:00 PM
Josh Garver
 
April 1, 2018 | Josh Garver

Mushroom and Goat Cheese Risotto

Print Recipe Here

8 Servings
Ingredients:
2 lbs of mushrooms – Mix of Porcini, Champignon, and Oyster
1 lb of pancetta – cubed
1 – 6oz log of goat cheese
4 oz of freshly grated parmesan
2 cups of Arborio Rice
1 large red onion - diced
6 cloves of garlic - pressed
6-8 cups of chicken stock – warmed
1 cup of dry white wine – Sauv Blanc, Pinot Grigio, etc.
1 bunch of Italian parsley
2 tbsp of Olive oil
Pinch of Pepper (No Salt – enough comes from the chicken stock and the pancetta)
Bonus: 8 eggs – poached
 
Instructions:
1. Begin by cubing the pancetta into small bite-size pieces.  In a large pan (which will be used the duration of this dish), brown the pancetta till crisp on all sides.  Once cooked, take the pancetta out of the pan and set aside, leaving the browned bits and juices behind. 
 
2. Add a tbsp of olive oil.  Once the olive oil is hot, toss in the diced onion and pressed garlic.  Stirring frequently, sweat the onions and garlic for 5 minutes. 
 
3. Add in the Arborio rice.  Stir constantly letting the rice become slightly browned.  This takes about 3-5 minutes. 
 
4. The first liquid to add is the 1 cup of wine (room temperature).  Once the liquid is being added, stirring needs to be constant. This whole process will take you roughly 25-30 minutes of stirring.  Just put on some good music and pour yourself a glass of wine.  It goes by quick.  Once the wine is absorbed, it’s time to start adding the chicken stock one cup at a time.  Wait for each to be absorbed before adding the next.  You don’t want mushy risotto, the final product should remain al dente before adding the cheese. 
 
5. Add in the raw mushrooms around the 4th cup of stock.  This recipe takes roughly 6 cups.  Stir in the mushrooms and they will begin to meld into the dish.  Once your risotto is at an al dente point, add in the small package of goat cheese and stir in.  At this point, add the cooked pancetta as well. 
 
6. Stir until everything is perfectly blended and your risotto is at a perfect al dente consistency. 
 
7. Chop up some fresh Italian parsley and garnish lightly.  Also, top with a little fresh grated parmesan if you wish.
 
8. For extra protein points, poach an egg and place it on top of the risotto as the crowning achievement.  The beautiful yoke will transform the dish to a whole other level.  Enjoy!!!
 
Pair with the El Coro Pinot Noir
Time Posted: Apr 1, 2018 at 9:25 AM
Ben Kraemer
 
February 27, 2018 | Ben Kraemer

Talking with the Wine Maker

 

How have the recent weeks of unseasonably warm weather affected the vineyard?

"Well uh yeah the lack of rain and the early heat tried to wake up the vines but these cold temps and the blow 30 nights have put them back to sleep, they tried to wake up and they have gone back to sleep if we get the rain in the forecast that will help.  Vines wakeup due to soil temp, so rain or frost will keep the vines from waking up showing “Bud Break”. 

We are currently at 7 inches of rain which is 40% of our normal rainfall, we want to be somewhere between 20 and 25 inches of rainfall by the end of the season, so we are keeping our fingers crossed for the rain.  Right now our irrigation ponds give us an ability to have a 2-year supply, and the little rain events that we have had have not increased the reserves, the soil moistures are decent.  So we will be good throughout the season.  Our landscaping crew will have to use reclaimed water this year to keep the grounds looking good."

What is your prediction of How this will affect the rest of the growing season?

"Right now we have dodged a bullet by avoiding early bud break.  If it stays cool through March, we can expect that we will be normal to our growing season.  However, depending on how hot it is through April and June will determine when we have to start watering.  Generally, our first watering is after 4th of July. Since we are not in a frost zone here at Keller Estate so there is no worry about freezing.

We are going to be doing a water event to add nutrients to the soil in April if all goes well.  We might have to go to a more Flair nutrient application depending on if we need to conserve our drip line water.  We will need to be a little more dynamic with our farming this year and be able to react to how warm then next few months are. "

Do you have a Bottling Update?

"The 2017 Chardonnay blends will be started in March and will be bottled by the End of May.  We are doing a custom blend for the Sonoma County Vintners Barrel Auction that will be happening in April if anyone is interested.  It is a unique blend that I make every year for this event, and I am very excited for how this turned out.

We only rack only once and are tasting the barrels and evaluating which barrels are performing well and getting the blends together in my head."

What the biggest challenge right now?

"Our biggest challenge right now is our transition to organic farming, it is a real challenge.  We have to break down the estate into three parts, soil nutrition, and herbicides, pesticide/fungicide.  So the soil nutrition is probably the easiest to handle and that is going to be a pretty easy transition, however, the fungicide is also relatively easy to transitions over, the biggest challenge is the herbicide.  There are very few organic herbicides that are effective, generally, it comes down to manual manipulation i.e. weed whackers or tractor attachments.  Either way, there is an additional strain on the labor force to be able to take that on.  We are working on the best scenario, to allow for this transition to be made.  The growth under vine can increase mold risk and cause competition in the vine.  It really comes down to a big monetary investment to transition to organic.

This is the right time of the year to do this, and we are working out our game plan for the complete transition.  We are going to a 100 percent organic fungicide program for this year and hopefully implement our plan for organic herbicide as our next steps.  I am focusing right now less on the wines, as they are doing very well, and more on sustainability, this year’s action plans, and our transition to organic farming."

Time Posted: Feb 27, 2018 at 12:37 PM
Josh Garver
 
February 27, 2018 | Josh Garver

SAVORY POLENTA WAFFLES WITH BAKED CHICKEN

For THE CHICKEN

8 Boneless chicken thighs (small to medium in size)
1 container of whole wheat bread crumbs
1 tsp Dried basil
1 tsp Dried tarragon
1 tsp Dried thyme
1 tsp Cumin
1 tsp Garlic powder
1 tsp Onion powder
 Pinch of Pepper
2 eggs
1 cup whole wheat flour

For THE WAFFLE

1 1/2 Cups BOB's polenta
1/2 Tbsp of baking powder
1/4 Cup of cornstarch
3 Cups of milk
2 Tbsp of butter
1 1/2 Cups of sharp cheddar

For THE SYRUP

½ cup of maple syrup
2 tbsp of Huy Fong (Sriracha producer) Chili Garlic Sauce

Directions

1. Preheat the oven to 400 degrees and get your waffle maker out and preparing to heat.  Get out 3 mixing bowls for prepping the chicken and you will need one bowl for the waffle batter. 

2. Wash and dry the chicken thighs.  In one bowl mix together all dried herbs, breadcrumbs, and parmesan cheese.  In another bowl, put the whole wheat flour.  In the last bowl, beat the 2 eggs.

3. First, dust the thighs with flour.  Second, dredge the thighs in the egg.  Third, cover the thighs thoroughly with the herb parmesan breadcrumb mix.

4. Place them on a grate that will fit nicely on your baking sheet.  Put the chicken in the oven for about 30 minutes uncovered, until nicely browned and cooked thoroughly.

5. Combine all waffle ingredients together in a mixing bowl and mix slowly with the hand-held mixer.  Do not over mix.  Feather in the grated cheese AFTER the other ingredients is mixed well. Distribute the waffle batter to your waffle maker and if you have a toaster oven, set to bake at the lowest temp and keep your waffles warm and crisp in there until everything is ready to be served.

6. For a super delicious spicy sweet maple syrup, combine the syrup with the chili garlic sauce and mix together.  It’s unbelievable.  If you don’t like spice, omit the chili sauce.

7. Once the chicken is baked, plate the waffle with two thighs and drizzle with the garlic chili maple syrup.

8. Enjoy this healthier version of chicken waffles with the Rotie!

Time Posted: Feb 27, 2018 at 12:00 PM
Josh Garver
 
February 17, 2018 | Josh Garver

Strawberry Olive Oil Cake with Mascarpone Frosting

Dry ingredients

2 1/2 cups All-Purpose Flour
1 1/2 cup Sugar
1 teaspoon Baking Soda
1 teaspoon Salt
1 teaspoon Cocoa Powder

Wet ingredients

1 1/2 cup Extra Virgin Olive Oil – Not strongly herbaceous
1 cup Buttermilk @ Room Temp
2 Large Eggs @ Room Temp
2 tablespoons Red Food Coloring
3 tablespoons Strawberry Infused Balsamic Vinegar
1 teaspoon Vanilla Extract
1 cup of macerated smashed chopped strawberries
1 tablespoon of red food coloring (optional)

Mascarpone frosting

1 – 8oz container of mascarpone cheese
1 cup of heavy whipping cream
½ cup of sugar
2 tsp of vanilla extract

1. Preheat the oven to 350F degrees. Rub a 9” springform pan with olive oil (be sure to be thorough) and then dust with flour.
2. In a large mixing bowl, sift together all dry ingredients listed above. In another large bowl, whisk together all the wet ingredients listed above.
3. Using a standing mixer, mix the dry ingredients into the wet ingredients. Do not overmix! Just enough to combine all ingredients.
4. Pour the cake batter into the springform pan. Place the pan in the oven. Bake for a total of 30 minutes. You will know the cake is done as it will brown around the top edges and start to pull away from the pan. Always do the toothpick test too in the middle of the cake.
5. Remove the cake from the oven and let it stand for 15-20 minutes to cool. You can then release the springform from around the cake. Let cool completely.
6. Macerate Strawberries – Chop two cups worth of strawberries and dust with ½ cup of sugar. Let them “marinate” in the sugar for a few hours if possible.
7. In a bowl let the mascarpone cheese get up to room temperature. In another bowl add the heavy whipping cream and vanilla extract. Using a handheld mixer, beat slowly to whip it and gradually add the sugar. Once the sugar is incorporated, fold the whipped cream mixture into the mascarpone cheese. Spread immediately over the top and sides of the cake. Top with the macerated strawberries and serve it up!!

Time Posted: Feb 17, 2018 at 10:43 AM
Ana Keller
 
December 15, 2017 | Ana Keller

Petaluma Gap AVA Approved

I am thrilled to announce that the Petaluma Gap American Viticultural Area will be official on January 6th, 2018. You may wonder: what does this mean? The official recognition of this area as a significant and distinctive grape growing region marks that beginning of a road to a broader acknowledgement of the quality of the wines produced in this area.

As time goes by, you will start to see wine labels and restaurant lists stating in black and white the origin of a bottle of Chardonnay or Pinot Noir as Petaluma Gap. Gradually as wine lovers become familiar with “the Gap” they might decide that they enjoy the beautiful bright acidity of a Chardonnay (like our “Oro de Plata”), and when you just can’t find a bottle of our wine, you might reach out for another Petaluma Gap Chardonnay, with the confidence that the qualities you love in our Chardonnay will most likely be in the new bottle you are reaching out to.

The work that grape-growers, winemakers and wine marketers have done to accomplish the Petaluma Gap is truly a tribute to the close tight knit wine business community: we know that “a rising tide lifts all boats”. I’ve been honored to have been part of this remarkable effort and I trust my children will continue to further the development of this region when they become stewards of our Estate.

 

Ana Keller
 
November 16, 2017 | Ana Keller

Traditional Buñuelos Mexicanos and the Holiday cheer.

Buñuelos signify celebration and revelry. They may have different names in different cultures, but, whether wrapped in paper at a carnival or concluding a holiday feast, variations of this fried dough dessert appear across many different cultures during the Christmas, Ramadan, and Hanukkah seasons.

The traditional Mexican version is more like a crispy, paper-thin, sweet tortilla “cookie.” Also known as Mexican fritters, Mexican buñuelos are traditionally served with a syrup that’s flavored with anise seeds that are similar to fennel seeds and give the treat a subtle liquorice-like taste. Many family's have a special recipe, some know someone who has a great recipe, point is, Mexican buñuelos signal time to get together. The strong Catholic culture and the fervent celebrations create a unique Christmas season as Mexican await the arrival of baby Jesus.  

In other countries, the 12 Days of Christmas are recognized, but in Mexico, the nine days of posadas leading up to Christmas Eve − Noche Buena (Holy Night) − are observed. During the reenactment, the posada hosts act as the inn keepers while their guests act as the pilgrims (los peregrinos).  Holding lighted candles, each group takes turns singing verses to each other. Although primarily a religious holiday including attendance at Christmas Eve mass (Misa de Aguinaldo or Misa de Gallo), Mexican holidays always offer an opportunity to enjoy a fiesta in true Mexican fashion, and Buñuelos play their special sweet role. 

Posada parties are not only marked by traditional rituals but are also filled with cheerful socializing, authentic food, and fun for the entire family, including a special Christmas drink and a piñata filled with candy. Traditional Mexican piñatas are designed in the shape of a seven-point star. The seven points represent the seven deadly sins that need to be destroyed by the ‘sinner’ who is blindfolded (signifying blind faith).  Hoping to conquer sin, he attempts to hit the swaying piñata with a stick and break open the center, which bestows him with ‘blessings’ (candy and fruit).

Hope you enjoyed learning a bit more about my family;s Mexican heritage and we look forward to celebrating with you the Holidays with some wine and buñuelos. See you at our Holiday Party!

 

Time Posted: Nov 16, 2017 at 4:02 PM
Alex Holman
 
October 30, 2017 | Alex Holman

2017 Vineyard Update

At Keller Estate, in the Petaluma Gap, Sonoma Coast. The 2017 growing season started with heavy, wonderful rains that saturated the parched clay soils.  2017 will be known as a year of extremes and abundance. Record setting rains, followed by warm weather led to the abundance of cover crop, weeds, and vigor. Cultivation and vine row management was delayed in many blocks due to wet conditions limiting tractor access.  Saturated soils delayed budbreak 1-2 weeks and bloom and verasion experienced the same delay. However, we experienced only average crop set due to the weather at bloom in 2016.

The average weather during bloom in May starts at 70 and raises to 80 degrees. 2017 had 10 days in May with temperatures above 85 degrees. This led to excessive vigor and laterals leading to an above average “second crop”, which added more manhours to our canopy management. Early wet conditions and high vigor contributed to a difficult canopy management season in a time when the labor force is at a premium.

Intermittent rain events created botrytis pressure, with even more demand on labor passes in the vineyard.

The high wet winter, caused the first 12 inches of the clay topsoil to become extremely hard and limited our ability the cultivation of our cover crops. Our irrigation regime started 2 weeks later, which was some benefit, because we would end up needing that water later in the season.

Verasion in the Petaluma Gap was late and slow to finish due to the abundance of early morning fog where many days didn’t blow off until 1pm.  We were green thinning in mid-August and phenolic development was anticipated to be finished September 7-15 on most blocks.

The last weekend of August, most Pinot Noir blocks were still two weeks delayed and the sugars were 20-21 brix. August 26th started 15 days of extreme heat above 95 and 7 days above 104. Diligent watering saved us from catastrophic damage but prompted us to pick our early blocks immediately. The next week set off a furious picking schedule that could not keep up with demand. Labor Day weekend followed with three straight days above 105 degrees without any of the cool Petaluma Gap winds by night. We normally pick our Pinot Noir blocks in a span of about one month to ensure a range of phenolic maturity. In 2017 we picked our entire Pinot Noir in 10 days. In a cruel twist of fate, temperatures dropped after the heatwave to below average temps for 10 days. Many blocks that survived the heat went backward in brix and have turned out to be some of our most intense, opulent lots in our cellar.

When the heat wave hit, Chardonnay was only 17 brix, and got a jolt of sugar, without much phenological maturation. However, once the heat subsided and we had 10 days of below average temperatures with a breeze, Chardonnay was able to get back on schedule and has turned out to be an exceptional year from early indications. We are looking forward to some beautiful Keller Estate Chardonnays! One positive from the heat was the fact that it dried up any botrytis pressure that was previously in the vineyard.

Syrah was generally unaffected by the heatwave due to the fact it was still finishing verasion during the worst part. According to the Sonoma County Grapegrowers Association all reporting AVA’s in Sonoma have recorded the highest “degree day summation” on record for 2017.

Without those 15 days of extreme heat, our opinion is that 2017 would have been one of the better vintages of the decade. With the heat, we can say, the vintage went from exceptional to a wonderful vintage here at Keller Estate.

 

 

 

Time Posted: Oct 30, 2017 at 12:31 PM
Ana Keller
 
October 12, 2017 | Ana Keller

Keller Estate-Wildfire Update-Visitors

Dear local Friends of Keller Estate,

Petaluma has been spared during this fire, and we have, once again emerged as a strong community that has been the hub for hope. Each hour, we see new creative ways of bringing relief to our friends in need and we are proud to be part of such a beautiful community. 

During this harrowing times it’s important that we all take care of ourselves and our families.  All our team has found ways to donate time and resources to those in need. Our deepest gratitude goes out to the first responders and in particular I am humbled by the strength and determination of our local Lakeville Fire Deparmtent. We know that it will take time and perseverance to rebuild and we as a family look forward to doing our part for Sonoma and our wine community. 

We are maintaining our open tasting room hours and will have an area set up for donations, which we will distribute to our local community in need.  We are specifically focusing on “back to school” Items. These items will be distributed via our friends at Petaluma Active 20-30 next Monday.

While our tasting room offerings will be less due to minimal staff, we are doing so because during tough times like these, it’s nice to have a place as a safe haven to take a deep breath and be able to relax for a short bit.  Being able to enjoy some beautiful wines doesn’t hurt either!

Please feel free to book via our automated system, give us a call at 707-765-2117 ext. 1 or send our Tasting Room Manager an email at josh@kellerestate.com if you would like to book a time to come up, donate and take a break with some beautiful wine.

From all of us at Keller Estate, be safe, keep your families safe and we wish all of you the best in these tough times.

Most warmly, 

Ana Keller

Ana Keller
 
October 10, 2017 | Ana Keller

Sonoma Fire update from Keller Estate

Dear friends and fans of Keller Estate,    

As the days slowly winds down, I feel we can find some words to express our gratitude for all the message of concern we've received. The winery is well, we had a few small fires nearby all day, which kept us concerned and making evacuation plans. Our region is well away from the other fires, and it seemed logical to focus on the devastating fires in Santa Rosa and Napa. Our strong volunteer Lakeville Patrol contained the fire and we can now focus our attention on supporting our friends in other areas. 

We trust that we will all come together as the strong community we are and re-build our region and continue to teach our children the value of community. Our entire team is safe, some have been evacuated, some have their jobs in peril, and we will be here for them and for all our neihgbors. My heart goes out to my many friends in the indsutry who have lost it all. Please keep them in your hearts and mind as you continue through your day.  

Most warmly,  

Ana Keller